Are there cooler people ever to have lived than Katharine Hepburn, Cary Grant and Howard Hawks as seen in these pictures from the set of Bringing up Baby?

No, no there are not. 

Courtesy Cinephilia and Beyond

theomeganerd:

Sunset Overdrive - Concept Art and Illustration

by Vasili Zorin |  Tumblr | Facebook

We’re all guilty of this from time to time, often in small ways but sadly sometimes in big ways.  
Be mindful when it is happening - when we see those around us fall and decide to just go along with it, at some point we are the problem.  You can’t stand up for everything, but if you stand up for nothing, why are you alive?

Quote by Martin Niemöller, in reference to the rise of the Third Reich.  Image Source http://ArcillaDesign.com/

We’re all guilty of this from time to time, often in small ways but sadly sometimes in big ways. 

Be mindful when it is happening - when we see those around us fall and decide to just go along with it, at some point we are the problem.  You can’t stand up for everything, but if you stand up for nothing, why are you alive?

Quote by Martin Niemöller, in reference to the rise of the Third Reich.  Image Source http://ArcillaDesign.com/

Something inherently inspiring and evocative about about secret doors in bookcases.

File away for when I own a house (and have no funding limitations).

An inspirational platitude I often hear is “If you set your mind on something and work hard enough, you can achieve anything.” Unfortunately for self-help gurus everywhere, it’s just not that easy.
Take for instance the sad tale of Donald Crowhurst, a British businessman who was driven to compete in the first around-the-world solo yacht race.  With his business failing, he set his sights on this race set up by British paper The Daily Mail.  He thought the money he would win for coming in first would solve his financial woes.  Too bad he was in no way qualified to sail anything around the world solo, let along a unique trimaran of his own design.  He called this unseaworthy boat the Teignmouth Electron.  
It did not end well for him.  His initial over-confidence coupled with his shame over the possibility of backing out ultimately led to his doom.  The picture above shows his boat, shipwrecked today in the Cayman islands.   
The 2006 documentary Deep Water tells the story of that around-the-world race with a focus on Crowhurst’s participation.  It’s a chilling film that I highly recommend. 


I think successful people preach “determination can overcome anything” and “hard work solves all” to make themselves feel good about how they got to where they are.  Wanting something is an important step to getting it, absolutely.  And lots of hard work will probably be required.  But willpower and perseverance are not enough.  You also need things like training, talent, skill, and the money to buy the right equipment.  And, yes, a good amount of luck. Be ambitious, yes, but don’t be insane in your ambition.
Something that Mr. Crowhurst’s sad story should remind us all.

An inspirational platitude I often hear is “If you set your mind on something and work hard enough, you can achieve anything.” Unfortunately for self-help gurus everywhere, it’s just not that easy.

Take for instance the sad tale of Donald Crowhurst, a British businessman who was driven to compete in the first around-the-world solo yacht race.  With his business failing, he set his sights on this race set up by British paper The Daily Mail.  He thought the money he would win for coming in first would solve his financial woes.  Too bad he was in no way qualified to sail anything around the world solo, let along a unique trimaran of his own design.  He called this unseaworthy boat the Teignmouth Electron.  

It did not end well for him.  His initial over-confidence coupled with his shame over the possibility of backing out ultimately led to his doom.  The picture above shows his boat, shipwrecked today in the Cayman islands.   

The 2006 documentary Deep Water tells the story of that around-the-world race with a focus on Crowhurst’s participation.  It’s a chilling film that I highly recommend. 

I think successful people preach “determination can overcome anything” and “hard work solves all” to make themselves feel good about how they got to where they are.  Wanting something is an important step to getting it, absolutely.  And lots of hard work will probably be required.  But willpower and perseverance are not enough.  You also need things like training, talent, skill, and the money to buy the right equipment.  And, yes, a good amount of luck. Be ambitious, yes, but don’t be insane in your ambition.

Something that Mr. Crowhurst’s sad story should remind us all.

Love the amount of detail in these - and how it so directly translated to the screen.  Impressive the amount of detailed planning these imply.

From the original poster, gabrielhardman:

Storyboards for Alfred Hitchcock’s STRANGERS ON A TRAIN. As far as I know these were drawn by Art Director Ted Haworth. His son Sean Haworth brought them in for me to see when we were working on a film together years ago and I made copies. 

Torque’s rap sheet, scanned in from the manual. 

Anyone remember manuals?  That had real narrative stuff in them? 

Henry Smith, Brain Dump alumnus and the crazy guy who made a game many love called Spaceteam, wants to make more games.  But  he’s worried about how he’ll make them and survive given the current publishing models - particularly on mobile. 

And he’s right.  Mobile’s a hard place to do something creative right now without figuring out how to monetize within the game, which of course means fundamentally changing the game itself.  

So he’d rather just release them for free. 

Watch/read him explain himself on Gamasutra.

To do this bold experiment, he needs our support while he makes them.  Thus he has launched a Kickstarter.  It’s a brave attempt, but if you agree that game design should not be monetization-design in disguise, if you just want to play your game without being overtly or subtly hit up for money while you’re playing it, if you want mobile games that are fun to play for everyone who plays them not just those who pay large sums of money, or if you just think Spaceteam was a pretty sweet game and you’d like more of that please, this is the project for you.   

Henry is one of the good guys.  And if Kickstarter was made for anything, it seems like it was made for this.

Akira Kurosawa hand sprinkles snow on Takashi Shimura before shooting a pivotal scene in Ikiru. 
There’s something very beautiful to me about Kurosawa taking the time to do it himself. A film may be a large production with many skilled artists involved, yet Kurosawa went to the trouble to get the smallest details exactly how he wanted them. 
(And it goes without saying - if you’ve only seen his samurai films, you should really see Ikiru.  Arguably Kurosawa’s best film.)

Akira Kurosawa hand sprinkles snow on Takashi Shimura before shooting a pivotal scene in Ikiru. 

There’s something very beautiful to me about Kurosawa taking the time to do it himself. A film may be a large production with many skilled artists involved, yet Kurosawa went to the trouble to get the smallest details exactly how he wanted them. 

(And it goes without saying - if you’ve only seen his samurai films, you should really see Ikiru.  Arguably Kurosawa’s best film.)

Shaolin Cowboy by Geoff Darrow

Shaolin Cowboy by Geoff Darrow