A reminder of how hard it has always been on all sides to enact meaningful change in an entrenched system. 

todaysdocument:

Forty years ago: Desegregation in Boston Public Schools

Boston, Massachusetts, has long been a crucible for social, cultural, and political change. But Boston is also a city of contradictions.

Forty years ago, a group of parents filed a formal complaint in the U.S. District Court for Massachusetts.  The case beings with this simple sentence: “This is a class action brought by black children attending the Boston public schools and their parents.”

Tallulah Morgan et al. v. James W. Hennigan et al., United States District Court Civil Action Case File No. 72-911-G—known as the Boston schools desegregation case—occupies 54 large storage boxes in the National Archives at Boston.  The case was presented over a period of two years, and on June 21, 1974, Federal Judge W. Arthur Garrity ruled that the School Committee of the City of Boston had “intentionally brought about and maintained racial segregation” in the Boston public schools.

The response to the implementation was protest, at times violent, but eventually the Boston Public Schools would change.

via Education Updates » Forty years ago: Desegregation in Boston Public Schools

Ultimate Gwen Stacy by Sara Pichelli

Ultimate Gwen Stacy by Sara Pichelli

After years in the corporate big-budget video game world, I think it’s basically a miracle that a mega-big new IP like Sunset Overdrive is shipping with the player able to play either gender and fully customize those characters in some pretty radical ways. 

It was in the game from the outset as part of Insomniac’s master plan, and I kept waiting for usual budget/schedule challenges to come up and squash it.  But it survived, hallelujah.   

So in just about a month, you really do get to live the apocalypse however you want.  It’s nice when we as developers remember that this medium is all about giving players choices.

The amazing covers of Glenn Fabry - who coincidentally I was lucky enough to hire to be the cover artist for Damage Incorporated.

But more importantly, the Preacher cover at top is a key inspiration for my so so authentic turn as a preacher in Roundabout.   You can totally see it, right? 

[ABOVE- Pictures of Lode Runner on the Apple II.  2nd from bottom image is the level editor on the PC, courtesy MobyGames.  Last image courtesy A2Central.] 

It’s sad to hear of the relatively young passing of Doug Smith, creator of a game I adore to this day: Lode Runner.  Along with other Br0derbund games of the early ’80s like Dan Gorlin’s Choplifter (1982) and Jordan Mechner’s Karateka(1984), Smith’s 1983 title Lode Runner stood out as a higher class of game.  Sure, it was a finely crafted action game at its core but it also made you think and it felt very unique, like something never seen before.  It was part of that golden age of home computer games when brilliant new mechanics seemed to show up every few months.  Lode Runner stands to this day as a testament to unique vision and pure artistic creation.  

Lode Runner is also important because it shipped with one of the first commercially available level editors.  My friends and I used the editor extensively to create our own levels for the game, which we traded back and forth on 5.25 floppy, trying to top each other.  That editor had a lot to do with me figuring out how game and level design worked, though I certainly didn’t think of it in those terms at the time. 

Learning level design in a super-constrained space can be very valuable.  Lode Runner had a small feature and rule-set, with maps that were required to fit on a single screen.  Yet the game had enough depth that you really could make some very unique and creative maps, you never felt like you were out of options.  Lode Runner’s constraints forced you to not just make spectacle or narrative, but to truly design. 

To any aspiring game designers out there not sure where to start, I recommend starting at the beginning and downloading an emulated version of the original Lode Runner.  Learn how it plays and then make your own maps.  Lode Runner will not provide you “tools skills” you can immediately apply to a job in the industry in 2014, but it will teach you the nuts and bolts of how compelling gameplay works, something that will prove far more valuable in the long run. 

Lode Runner taught me so much, I feel like I owe Doug Smith a lot.  Over the years I’ve been fortunate to get to meet a lot of my early gaming heroes in person and thank them.  Sad I will never get to do the same for Doug Smith.

Some footage from the Apple II version of Lode Runner.

roundaboutgame:

TWO DAYS TO GO!

One of the things we’re including in the Deluxe Edition is “The Making of Roundabout”, a huge compendium of art, stories, and the full Roundabout screenplay.

Check out how completely rad this is! Not only does it include the full 87 page shooting script from Roundabout, we’ve also annotated it with our stories and notes. On top of that, Panzer has also put together these brilliant art pages that talk about the origins of our characters, our logo, some behind the scenes pics - pretty much anything you could ever want!

If you haven’t already, you’re probably going to want the Deluxe Edition. Not only does it include “The Making of Roundabout”, it comes with the soundtrack, bonus unreleased videos and cut FMV, seven playable prototype and early builds showing the progression of the game, and Georgio Cam: the first-person April Fools Experience. All for only $5 more!

Pre-order Roundabout Deluxe Edition right here!

(P.S. If you already bought Roundabout but want the Deluxe Edition now, don’t panic! We’ll be releasing it as a separate add-on purchase at launch too!)

Usually don’t post a lot of GIFs here, but this is the most brilliant use of the short looping animation I’ve seen to to date. 

Artist Kevin Weir Creates Ghostly Animated GIFs Using Archival Photos from the Library of Congress

From the Paris Review:
“I was always thinking about how I would become a great novelist. 
I just didn’t think that I would write crime novels. I thought that I would be a literary writer, whose creative duty is to describe the world as it is. The problem is that I never enjoyed books like that. I only enjoyed crime stories. So more than anything, this fascination with writing was an issue of identity. I had a fantasy of what it meant to be a writer: the sports cars, the clothes, the women.
“But I think what appealed to me most about it was that I could assume the identity of what I really loved to do, which was to read. Nobody told me I couldn’t write a novel. I didn’t live in the world of graduate writing schools. I wasn’t part of any scene or creative community. I happened to love crime novels more than anything, so I wrote a crime novel first. I didn’t buy the old canard that you had to start by writing short stories, and only later write a novel. I never liked reading short stories, so why the fuck should I want to write one? I only wanted to write novels.”
—James Ellroy, The Art of Fiction No. 201

From the Paris Review:

“I was always thinking about how I would become a great novelist. 
I just didn’t think that I would write crime novels. I thought that I would be a literary writer, whose creative duty is to describe the world as it is. The problem is that I never enjoyed books like that. I only enjoyed crime stories. So more than anything, this fascination with writing was an issue of identity. I had a fantasy of what it meant to be a writer: the sports cars, the clothes, the women.

“But I think what appealed to me most about it was that I could assume the identity of what I really loved to do, which was to read. Nobody told me I couldn’t write a novel. I didn’t live in the world of graduate writing schools. I wasn’t part of any scene or creative community. I happened to love crime novels more than anything, so I wrote a crime novel first. I didn’t buy the old canard that you had to start by writing short stories, and only later write a novel. I never liked reading short stories, so why the fuck should I want to write one? I only wanted to write novels.”

James Ellroy, The Art of Fiction No. 201

A great time was had by all at the PAX Brain Dump 2014 last weekend at PAX Prime in Seattle.  Thanks to the fine list of speakers, who each got five minutes to share their “One Weird Trick” to development. Afterward we got to talk to folks who came up to ask questions one-on-one. 

Particular thanks due to Nels Anderson, who ended up joining the session at the last minute when someone dropped out.

Quite a range of ideas were shared, suitable both to game developers and gamers alike.  If you want to get a sense of what everyone talked about, I have uploaded the slides at the below link.  (Not all slides have notes, but many of them do.) 

http://paranoidproductions.com/miscwritings/PAXBrainDump2014Web.ppt

I always seat our speakers in a the front row in the order they will speak - so above you’ll see (from left to right) Bernie, Ellen, Sylvain (who took the picture from on stage), Deborah, Nels (missing from the first shot), Katie, Jeff, and Eka.  Thanks all!